Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov
Ruins | Petr Antonov

Ruins: The series reflects on the role and place of the ruined church in contemporary Russian landscape, and on how it relates to our perception of history and time. Scattered throughout the landscape the ruins come as remnants of Russia’s own antiquity, something not too distant in time, but seemingly unrelated to the country of today. As Russia seems to be searching its past for the lost identity, the ruins pose a question: who do we want associate ourselve with—those who built these churches, or those who closed them down? Neither, or both?